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Posted on in Traffic Violations

CT defense lawyerMost people think of traffic violations as everyday occurrences that one can pay a fine to resolve easily. While sometimes this is the case, sometimes the infraction is more severe, and while it is still a traffic violation, these can be quite serious, leading to license suspension and even revocation if the offense or offenses merit it. Enlisting an experienced attorney to help you defend against a traffic violation can save you time and trouble in the long run.

Many Different Kinds

Because the term ‘traffic violation’ can encompass so many things in Connecticut, it can be overwhelming to someone who has been charged with one, and it can be confusing to try and differentiate the charges which can be paid off with a fine from those that are much more serious. Also, some traffic violations may also be chargeable under criminal law as well as civil law, which means that even if you are found not liable under civil law, you might still be found guilty in criminal court, especially if you are deemed to have acted recklessly or with malice.

Something that also must be kept in mind is that even small infractions can result in points being added to your driver’s license, and points add up. Connecticut sends a warning letter to everyone who accumulates more than six points at any one time, but if you acquire more than ten, your license will be suspended for 30 days. If you are detained for a moving violation during that suspension period, or if your point total goes over ten at any time in the next five years afterward, your license will be suspended again until you get your point total below ten.

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CT defense lawyerWhile no parent likes to think about it, sometimes our children act in ways that are less than legal. When they do, it can often come as a great shock to learn that we as parents may be on the proverbial hook for the monetary damages. Connecticut has what are called parental liability laws which seek to place some of the liability for damages on the shoulders of parents of minor children. If your child commits a crime or an intentional tort (the equivalent under civil law), it is important that you understand the extent of your own responsibilities under the law.

Parents Held Responsible for Minors

While it can be an unwelcome surprise for parents to find they are liable for the damage their children cause, the rationale for holding them liable is fairly clear. In all walks of life, a parent is responsible for their children until they reach the age of majority, which is 18 in Connecticut. This responsibility simply extends to their children’s actions outside the home and immediate family sphere. However, there are limitations on this liability, and it also does not mean that no liability will extend to the minor themselves.

The law states that the maximum monetary threshold for parental liability on behalf of their minor child is $5,000. However, this threshold only applies if a parent is held liable under the specific statute. If a parent is sued for negligence - for example, if they had reason to believe that their child was going to do something violent and took no steps to stop them - that cap would not apply.

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CT defense lawyerWhile in recent months, the possession of small amounts of marijuana has been decriminalized in Connecticut, it would be a mistake to assume that other drug laws are being similarly relaxed. This is especially true for those who have the intention to sell, and on top of that, those who sell more dangerous substances like heroin or hallucinogenic drugs may face even stiffer penalties. There is a hierarchy of sorts when it comes to Fairfield County drug offenses, and if you have been charged with one, especially with possession with intent to sell (PWITS), you need an attorney who understands the law’s specific nuances.

Intent May Not Matter

While it may seem confusing or counter-intuitive, Connecticut law surrounding possession of drugs versus possession with intent to sell does not make a distinction as to whether someone actually intends to sell the drugs or not. The law is structured in such a way that if you possess a certain amount of a drug, you can be charged with intent to sell it, whether you did have that intent or not. The only time intent actually becomes relevant as to whether or not you will be convicted is at trial - a jury may decide, for example, that you had no intent to sell drugs, and thus you should be found not guilty.

In some cases, you may not even have physical possession of the item you are charged with possessing - this is called constructive possession, and it means that you were able to exercise control over the item, even if it did not technically belong to you. For example, if drugs are found in your bedroom (after a valid search warrant is executed on the premises), you might be charged with possession since it is your room and because no one else can be said to have had control of the item while it was there. Generally, if you have a say in how something is disposed of or sold, you can be said to have constructive possession of it, and this is, in some cases, enough to charge you with possession with intent to sell.

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CT DUI lawyerIt is illegal to operate a motor vehicle in Connecticut when your blood alcohol content (BAC) is .08 percent or higher. (If you are an underage driver, it is illegal to operate a motor vehicle when your BAC is 0.02 percent or higher).

Under Connecticut’s implied consent law, it is presumed that all drivers have consented to taking a chemical test to determine BAC.

There are three different methods police use to determine a driver’s BAC: breath, blood or urine. Breath tests (using a breathalyzer) are the most common method, but it is up to the arresting police officer to make that call.

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Connecticut defense attorneyWith school out of session on account of winter break and snow on the ground, actions that start out as mere mischief may get out of hand and rise to the level of torts and crimes. While it may seem inconsistent with the wintertime and holiday spirit, hitting someone with a snowball can bring serious consequences if injuries are sustained. The same is true for sledding-related horseplay that devolves into fist fighting. You may be charged with the crime of assault or battery, or sued in civil court for money damages. If you have been charged with assault or battery in Connecticut, you need an experienced Norwalk criminal defense attorney to protect your legal rights.

Defining Assault and Battery in Connecticut

In the general, common law sense, battery is a harmful or offensive contact. In Connecticut, more specifically, battery is the “willful application of force with the intent to cause bodily injury or offensive contact.” Assault, in the most basic sense, attempted battery. Specifically, under state law, assault is “attempted battery or the intent to cause another reasonable apprehension or contact.” In these two definitions, one can infer the importance of 1) intent and 2) whether or not contact actually occurs. Even if you have been unsuccessful in making contact, or merely intend to make another human being believe that you intend to make contact (but do not make contact), you may still be properly charged with assault in Connecticut.

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Connecticut defense attorneyIf you have been charged with rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, or other sexual misconduct while attending a university in the state of Connecticut, it is imperative that you secure legal representation experienced in the defense of crimes alleged to have been committed on college campuses. If convicted you face jail time, expulsion from your university, a lifetime of reputational damage, and long-term educational and vocational barriers. When so much on the line, when the consequences are of the utmost gravity, an experienced Fairfield criminal defense attorney is a critical resource.

Criminal Defendants Are Guaranteed Rights Under the Constitution

Legal representation in the wake of sex crimes allegations and charges is focused on the protection of your legal rights. When arrested, for example, the Constitution demands that the arresting officer inform you of your rights under Miranda v. Arizona to remain silent and to have an attorney, whether obtained at your own expense or appointed for you. From the time of arrest, constitutional rights, under the Fourth and Fifth Amendments, are retained during time spent in police custody, including during any instances police interrogation.

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Connecticut defense lawyer, Connecticut DUI attorneyBeing convicted of driving while under the influence of alcohol is life-altering under any circumstances. The offense can have a substantial impact on your driving privileges and can also negatively affect sentencing for future non-related crimes. As if these penalties were not prerogative enough to dispute any allegation of DUI, if you are a CDL license holder, your career may be put jeopardy.

Different Laws to Follow

The career of a commercial driver license (CDL) holder revolves around the ability to safely operate a vehicle. In most situations, the trucks they are responsible for maneuvering are many times larger than the average car on the road. If they were to collide, significant, potentially catastrophic injuries and even death are possible. For these reasons, the standards set for CDL drivers to uphold are higher. Regulations pertaining to operating a commercial vehicle are as follows:

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