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CT defense lawyerWhile all types of criminal charges can result in serious penalties, sex crimes are often treated differently than other offenses. A person who is accused of committing these types of offenses may have their reputation and personal character attacked, and they may face consequences to their personal life, their relationships, and their career, even if they are never convicted of criminal charges. Offenses related to child pornography are taken especially seriously by law enforcement. Those who are accused of these types of crimes will need to understand how the law addresses these situations and the potential penalties they may face if convicted.

Child Pornography Offenses in Connecticut

Connecticut law defines child pornography as a visual depiction of a child under the age of 16 engaging in sexually explicit conduct. In cases involving child pornography, a person may face multiple different types of charges, including:

  • First-degree possession of child pornography - This offense involves the knowing possession of at least 50 different pieces of child pornography, at least one piece of child pornography depicting a serious injury or the threat of a serious injury, or a video with at least two frames depicting sexually explicit conduct involving two or more children or more than one act of sexually explicit conduct involving one child. This is a Class B felony, and if a person is convicted, they may face a prison sentence of up to 20 years in prison, and five years of the sentence cannot be reduced or suspended.
  • Second-degree possession of child pornography - This offense involves the knowing possession of between 20 and 50 different pieces of child pornography or a video with at least 20 frames depicting one act of sexually explicit conduct by one child. This is a Class C felony, and if a person is convicted, they may face a prison sentence of up to 10 years in prison, and two years of the sentence cannot be reduced or suspended.
  • Third-degree possession of child pornography - This offense involves the knowing possession of less than 20 different pieces of child pornography or a video with fewer than 20 frames depicting one act of sexually explicit conduct by one child. This is a Class D felony, and if a person is convicted, they may face a prison sentence of up to five years in prison, and one year of the sentence cannot be reduced or suspended.
  • Importing child pornography - A person may be charged with this offense if they knowingly bring at least three pieces of child pornography into the state of Connecticut with the intent of promoting child pornography. This is a Class B felony, and five years of a person’s sentence cannot be reduced or suspended.
  • Sexting - A person under the age of 18 may be charged with a child pornography offense if they knowingly possess or send electronic images of a child under the age of 16 engaging in sexually explicit conduct. This offense is a Class A misdemeanor, and a conviction can result in a prison sentence of up to one year.

Contact Our Stamford Child Pornography Charges Lawyer

If you or a member of your family have been accused of any offenses related to child pornography, you can work with an attorney from Law Offices of Daniel P. Weiner to determine how to respond to and defend against these charges. To set up a free consultation and get legal help with your case, contact our Fairfield County sex crimes defense attorney at 203-348-5846.

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CT criminal lawyerBeing convicted of criminal charges can result in a number of penalties, which can range in severity depending on the nature of the offense, the person’s previous criminal record, and other factors. Among the different types of offenses, sex crimes are some of the most serious, since a person will not only face consequences such as fines and imprisonment but they may also be required to register as a sex offender. People in Connecticut who have been accused of sexual offenses will want to understand whether a conviction will cause their name to be listed in the sex offender registry, and by working with a skilled criminal defense lawyer, they can determine their best options for addressing these charges and avoiding penalties that will affect their lives, their freedom, and their reputation.

Sex Offender Registration Requirements

The requirements a person must follow when registering as a sex offender will depend on the nature of their offense. A person who is convicted of a sexually violent offense, such as first-degree sexual assault, aggravated sexual assault, or aggravated sexual assault of a minor, will be required to register as a sex offender for the rest of their life. A person who is convicted of a nonviolent sexual offense, such as second-degree or third-degree sexual assault, will be required to register as a sex offender for 10 years. Following a second conviction for a nonviolent sexual offense, a person will be required to register as a sex offender for life.

The requirement to register as a sex offender begins after a person is released into the community, including those who are sentenced to probation, those who are released on parole, and those who have completed a prison sentence. Within three days after being released, a person must notify the Connecticut Commissioner of Emergency Services and Public Protection, providing them with their name and address, as well as their email address and other accounts used online, their identifying characteristics, and their criminal record. A person will also be required to immediately update their registration if they move to a new address or make any other changes to the information included in the registry.

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Fairfield CT sex crime defense attorneyMost experts agree that a person’s brain is not fully developed until about age 25. Because children’s brains are still developing and they have not had the life experience needed to make informed choices about sex, children cannot consent to sexual activities by law. However, the “age of consent,” or age at which a person is considered old enough to consent to sex, varies from state to state. The relationship between the child and the person with whom they have a sexual relationship also affects the legality of the relationship. If you or a loved one has been accused of having sexual relations with someone under the age of consent, you may be arrested and charged with a sex crime.

Sexual Activity With Someone Under the Age of Consent

The age of consent in Connecticut is 16. This means that anyone aged 15 or below is unable to consent to sex in the eyes of the law. Any sexual activity between an adult and someone under 16 may lead to criminal charges and potential jail time. However, there are exceptions to this law. If a child is over age 13 and he or she has a sexual relationship with someone less than four years older than him or her, this may not be considered a crime. For example, a 17-year-old who has a sexual relationship with a 15-year-old is not breaking the law unless there are other unlawful factors such as the use of force. This so-called “Romeo and Juliet” exception exists to protect teenagers from criminal prosecution for having consensual sexual relationships with other teenagers. There are also situations in which having sexual relations with someone over the age of consent may be in violation of Connecticut law. For example, if a person over age 20 in a position of authority such as a coach or teacher has sex with someone under 18, he or she may be charged with statutory rape.

Statutory Rape Laws in Connecticut

Sexual activity between a child under age 13 and a person three or more years older than the child is considered first-degree sexual assault in Connecticut. This Class A felony offense is punishable by fines up to $20,000 and up to 25 years in prison. Sex between a child aged 13 to 15 and someone at least four years older than the child is considered second-degree sexual assault. This is a Class B felony punishable by a maximum fine of $15,000 and up to 20 years’ imprisonment. Non-penetrative sexual activity between a child under 13 and someone more than two years older than the child is a Class D felony punishable by up to five years in prison and $5,000 in fines. In addition to fines, imprisonment, and other criminal consequences, individuals convicted of sex crimes against children will also need to register as sex offenders.

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CT defense lawyerBeing accused of sexual assault may come as a shock, especially if you believe the accusation to be partly or completely fabricated. You may have never had sexual relations with your accuser or have believed that your encounter was consensual. Though prosecutors have the burden of proving your guilt, the mere accusation can be enough to tarnish your reputation and throw your life into turmoil. You need to fight back against false sexual assault charges and can help your defense by taking the following actions when you have been accused:

  • Find a Good Defense Lawyer: Whenever you face criminal charges, your first step should be to contact a criminal defense lawyer. What you say and do following your arrest can become evidence in a criminal trial. A criminal defense lawyer will speak on your behalf and make sure that you are treated fairly by the law.
  • Be Honest with Your Lawyer: A person accused of sexual assault may be uncomfortable discussing the history of their interaction with the accuser. It may be that they were involved in an extra-marital affair or a relationship that would have professional consequences. Your defense attorney needs to know exactly what happened between you and the accuser, even if you are embarrassed to admit it.
  • Figure Out Your Timeline: Your defense will rely on your version of the events leading up to and during the alleged assault. Depending on how long ago the alleged assault occurred, it may be difficult to recall all of the details. You need to come up with a timeline of events as you can best remember and stay consistent with that story.
  • Identify Your Evidence: Evidence in a sexual assault case often comes down to “he said, she said,” but there can be tangible evidence that backs up your testimony. Text messages, emails, and phone calls can show whether your relationship was consensual and may contradict your accuser’s testimony. If you deny having been with the person at the time of the alleged assault, a witness could testify as to your whereabouts at that time.
  • Stay Calm: Perceptions about your character may determine whether a court will believe your testimony in a sexual assault case. It is important that you refrain from public outbursts or verbal attacks against your accuser, including staying silent on social media about the case. Aggressive and emotional behavior leaves an impression on the court that you are the type of person they could imagine committing a sexual assault.

Contact a Fairfield County Criminal Defense Lawyer

It is possible to quash a false sexual assault charge against you with the right legal representation. A Stamford criminal defense attorney at the Law Offices of Daniel P. Weiner can put you in the best position to win your case. To schedule a free consultation, call 203-348-5846.

 

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CT defense lawyerSex crimes cause untold suffering for their victims, but can also cause serious trouble for those unjustly accused. Because these crimes are so serious, sometimes law enforcement will arrest and charge a defendant when they lack sufficient evidence to get a conviction. If this has happened to you, it is crucial that you seek out an attorney with the experience to help you fight this type of charge before its consequences can be visited on you.

A Variety of Charges

Sex crimes under Connecticut law are fairly wide-ranging, as the actual conduct in question may range from a single touch to the more popularly understood perception of sexual assault. However, any offense that can be shown to have a sexual or prurient component may qualify as a sex offense - for example, Connecticut law establishes that any touching of a sexual nature outside the clothing is sexual assault in the fourth degree, which can be a Class D felony or Class A misdemeanor, depending on the specific situation.

State law also allows for the possibility of “aggravated” assault, which may be charged when an alleged sex crime is perpetrated under specific circumstances. For example, a person may be charged with aggravated sexual assault in the first degree if they commit sexual assault in the first degree, but they do so with an accomplice or with a deadly weapon (or they convince the victim they have a deadly weapon they are not afraid to use).

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